Category Archives: North Pacific Coast

NPC Line – Cazadero

Cazadero was the northern end of the line for the North Pacific Coast Railroad.  Here is the track plan as of 1916, well after the Northwestern Pacific had taken over.

Cazadero Plan

This drawing shows the yards in Cazadero.

End of the Line for the North Pacific Coast Railroad Cazadero

End of the Line for the North Pacific Coast Railroad Cazadero

This is a shot of the gallows turntable being used to turn an engine at Cazadero.

Cazadero Turntable

This shot shows a train about to leave the station in Cazadero.

Cazadero StationThis is a station drawing.

Cazadero Depot Drawing

This is another station photograph showing the tracks leading into the station.

Cazadero Depot 1914

 

This drawing is of Ingrams Hotel in Cazadero which burned in 1902.  It is likely to be the hotel shown on the earlier yard drawing.

Ingram's Hotel Cazadero

Ingram’s Hotel Cazadero

Modeling Interest

As the end of the line for the NPC, Cazadero is crucial.  In addition the Magnesite RR interchanged just to the south and Elim, the site of the Austin Creek Tragedy is within a mile.

 

PC&N Picnic Car

The North Pacific Coast transported folks wanting to get away from San Francisco for the weekend North to a number of locations along the Russian River in open Picnic Cars.  The following photo shows a Picnic Car in the Sausalito docks area in the 1890s.

NPC_Warf_Picnic

The picnic car is the last car in the rightmost consist in the above photo.

picnic-train1

A picnic train is caught leaving Cazadero in the above photo.

One of the restoration societies has taken one of its 1:1 Carter flats and is converting it into a picnic car.  The following photos show the car mid-construction.

PicnicCar1PicnicCar2PicnicCar3

 

I think I’ll do the same thing in adding some picnic car interest to my layout.

NPC Main Line Map

This is the map of the NPC Main line as it existed at the time the NPC prototype is being loosely modeled as a freelance railroad, the Pacific Coast & Northern.  The first image is from the Northeastern part of the NPC.  The second is from the Southwestern part of the NPC.

NPC_MapEast640

NPC_MapWest640

In comparing these maps to the layout, you will see that the vast majority of the layout focuses on the northeastern portion of the NPC.  The major exception is the shops, yards, and dock in Sausalito.

North Pacific Coast Masons in Action

One of the Mason Bogies that saw the longest use by any railroad was Number 2, the San Rafel of the North Pacific Coast RR, logging 40 years of service.  Her 0-6-6T brother, the Bully Boy (pictured above) logged over 25 years of service.   In the above photo, the Bully Boy is pulling a passenger consist of seven cars out of the NPC passenger shed in Sausalito.  The passengers have just disembarked from the NPC ferry the Sausalito seen on the left after traveling from San Francisco.   Source – “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” – p60

Both engines were used in primarily in traffic to and from end of line stations lacking turntables, as they worked equally well running in either direction.  Click the above photo for a larger image.

All photos on this page are from ‘Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods – the Story of the North Pacific Coast Railway …”, an outstanding in-print book on this interesting narrow gauge line.

NPC_No8_Bldr_Enhanced_4x2

Ok, this may not be an action photo, or is it?  What a cool flat car load — the Bully Boy’s builders photo.  Click the photo for a bigger image.

SanRafel_MV2_4x2

It’s 1890.  The San Rafel has just pushed a track inspection car into Mill Valley.Source – “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” – p72Click photo for a larger image.

SanRafel_MV1_4x2

This photo, taken in 1892 shows the San Rafael pulling a passenger train tender first out of Mill Valley back to Sausalito.Source – “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” – p72.  Click the photo for a larger image.

SanRafel_MV3_4x2

This photo, also from 1892 shows the San Rafael on its way to Mill Valley from the train shed in Sausalito.  Source – “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” – p74Click photo for a larger image.

SanRafel_Wreck_4x2

In this 1903 photo, the San Rafael is in the ditch as a result of jumping the track near Millwood.  Its the only top view of a Mason Bogie in the Archive.Source – “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” – p108Click photo for a larger image. 

 

North Pacific Coast RR – Bully Boy 0-6-6T

NPC8-2_4x2

Builders photo of the Bully Boy of the North Pacific Coast Railroad at Mason Factory in 1877 loaded on a Lovells standard gauge flat for shipment.  .Source – “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” Graves – – p134.  Click picture for a larger image.

NPC_No8_Bldr_Enhanced_4x2

This is the same builders photo.  It is a scan of an original in the 1879 Mason Narrow Gauge Locomotive Catalog.  Click photo for a larger image.  Click here for a larger digitally enhanced version of this photo.  Photo and catalog from the Keith Christenson collection.  Thanks Keith.

Bully_Boy_steaming_4x2

This second Bully Boy builders photo was apparently taken before the prior photo.  It shows the Bully Boy with both a front pilot and rear pilot.  It also shows a headlight, a rare feature on a Mason Builder’s photo.  Click photo for a larger image.  Photo from the Keith Christenson collection.

NPC8-1_4x2

In action after installation of a new stack.  She was damaged by a fire in 1905 and never rebuilt.  She was scrapped in 1912.  Shot leaving the Sausalito train shed.Source – “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” – p50 and Redwood Railways – Kneiss p62Click picture for a larger image.

 

 

 

 

Name Bully Boy Number 8
Works No 584 Type 0-6-6T
Date 1877 Drivers 3’1″
Cylinders 13×16 Weight
Gauge 3’0″
Later RR North Western Pacific

Known Facts:  Sold to the North Pacific Coast in 1877 by Mason (Abbott & Graves).  Was used in picnic service, on the Mill Valley run, and as a work train at various points in her life.  Was often used in situations where she needed to run in both directions because a turntable was not available.  Damaged in an engine house fire in Tomales in 1905, the Bully Boy was not rebuilt, ending up on the scrap pile.

Speculation:  A Roy Graves drawing shows her with pilots mounted to both ends in “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” p156.  While no photographic evidence we’ve seen supports this, it is likely that she had pilots at both ends during part of her career because the NPC had a number of local runs to terminals lacking a turntable to turn engines around.  We have photos of her sister engine, the San Rafael with pilots on both ends.

This is the original NPC #3 Tomales.  She was never delivered to the North Pacific Coast.Source – “The Northwestern Pacific Railroad” – Stindt – p276Click photo for a larger image.
She was delivered to the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio in 1876 and became number 22 and was given the name Dixi Crosby.  Here is a builders photo of her wearing Galveston colors.This photo is from the Keith Christenson Collection.Click photo for a larger image.
Name Tomales Number 3
Works No 584 Type 0-6-6T
Date 1877 Drivers 3’0″
Cylinders 15×20 Weight
Gauge 3’0″
Later RR Northwestern Pacific

Facts:  According to Graves and Stindt she was built by Mason in 1874, and was Mason builders #563.  While she was originally assigned NPC engine number 3, she was never delivered to the NPC and was sold to the Minnesota Midland.  Then she was resold to the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio becoming number 22 and named the Dixi Crosby.  She was regauged to standard gauge and became the Southern Pacific’s number 658 in 1884 (Graves).

According to the Abbott builders list, She was sold to the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio in 1876 and became number 22 and was given the name Dixie Crosby.  The NPC and the Minnesota Midland are not mentioned in the Abbott list.  She had 15 x 20 cylinders and 3’0″ drivers.  With these dimensions she was not an identical sister of the Bully Boy.

Speculation:

It is unclear why the NPC never took delivery of the Tomales.  Clearly she came close enough to delivery to have a builders photo.  Did the fact she was never delivered have something to do with the rail jumping tendencies of the early Mason Bogies?  Did the fact that the San Rafael ended up on her roof in Tomales Bay in 1875 have anything to do with the cancelled order.  Maybe a NPC historian can help us resolve this question.

Three sources (Abbott, Graves, & Stindt) indicate that the name used on the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio in 1876 was the Dixie Crosby.  Yet the above photo shows the spelling as Dixi Crosby.  We are hoping someone with knowledge of the history of the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio railroad can resolve this inconsistency.

It is not known whether this engine was ever delivered to the Minnesota Midland.  Hopefully, someone with a knowledge of this line can resolve this issue.

Based on Graves comments, it is not clear whether this engine was regauged to standard gauge prior to shipment to the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio or when the railroad became part of the Southern Pacific system.  Stindt indicates it was converted prior to shipment.  The Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio RR is not listed in Hilton’s “American Narrow Gauge Railroads” so it is probable that she was converted to standard gauge by Mason prior to shipment in 1876.  We are hoping someone with knowledge of the history of the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio railroad can verify this assumption.

The following is a collection of logos of the NPC and its successor lines.  Colors are limited to the Web color pallet and are probably not accurate.

 

North Pacific Coast RR – San Rafael – 0-4-4T

NPC2-3_4x2

The San Rafael – Engine Number 2 of the North Pacific Coast Railroad.  Pushing an inspection at Millwood in 1890.Source – “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” – Graves – p73Click picture for a larger image.

NPC2-1_4x2

Dolled up for the 4th of July at Millwood, July 1901.Source – “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” – p27Click picture for a larger imag

NPC2-4_4x2

She was damaged in a fire in 1905 along with the Bully Boy.  She was rebuilt, then scrapped in 1912.This photo, from 1892 shows the San Rafael on its way to Mill Valley from the train shed in Sauselito.  Source – “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” – p74Click picture for a larger image.

NPC2-5_4x2

This photo shows her new cab after the rebuild in work train duty at Cazadero.Source – “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” – p110Click picture for a larger image.

NWP_no2_4x2

 Another post-rebuild shot at the San Quentin ferry landing in 1906. Source – “The Northwestern Pacific Railroad” – Stindt – p34.Click photograph for a larger image.

 

 

 

Name San Rafael Number 2
Works No 537 Type 0-4-4T
Date 1874 Drivers 3’6″
Cylinders 12×16 Weight
Gauge 3’0″
Later RR Northwestern Pacific

Known Facts: This is the San Rafael of the North Pacific Coast railroad.  She was referred to on the railroad as The Jackrabbit (Graves & others).  She was sold to the NPC by Mason in 1874 (Abbott list).  She went through a number of cab and equipment upgrades in her tenure on the NPC and its successor lines.  She was used extensively as the Mill Valley Local because of the fact she could run in either direction.  There was no turntable at the end of the line in Mill Valley (Graves).  She was damaged in the engine house fire in Tomales along with the Bully Boy in 1905.  Unlike the Bully Boy, she was rebuilt (Graves).

According to Graves and Stindt, both the San Rafael and the Bully Boy had a tendency to jump tracks.  The San Rafael ended up on her roof in Tomales Bay in 1875.  There is also a photo of her laying on her side on the NPC Masons in Action page as a result of a 1903 derailment.  As a result of their experience with Mason Bogie derailments, use of the two Mason Bogies was restricted to local service wherever possible (Graves).

Speculation:  According to Graves, some old timers interviewed in preparation of his book claimed that she was one of two double headed engines that pulled the formal NPC opening train on January 7, 1875 along with Number 1, the Sausalito.  Others claim that the second engine was not the San Rafael but was Number 4, the Olema.

While engine No 1, the Sausalito was the first engine delivered to the NPC it is not clear whether the San Rafael was the second, although its engine number suggests that it may have been.  The NPC also took delivery of No 4 and No 6, Baldwin 4-4-0s in 1874.

The Graves book shows her with an initial engine number of 2 and a later engine number of 89 (beginning in 1908) on the Northwestern Pacific railroad after takeover of the North Shore (successor to the NPC) in 1907.  Stindt indicates that while the number of 89 was tentatively assigned to the San Rafael, she was never re-stenciled.  No photos have surfaced of the San Rafael in Northwestern Pacific colors.  Graves indicates that she was scrapped in 1912.  Use of the San Rafael on the NWP is unknown.  Did she continue to work on the road after 1908?  Or did she sit in the bone yard until scrapped in 1912?

The San Rafael may be the only Mason Bogie to have run all three fuel types.  She was originally a wood burner as most of the above photos show.  The NPC ran a brief experiment with coal with some of its engines in the early 1890s, converting them back to wood upon change in management in 1893 (Graves).  While no photos have surfaced showing the San Rafael with a coal load, one of the Bully Boy photos in the archive shows it with a coal load.  Because coal needed to be shipped in, it is likely that the coal burners operated out of Sausalito.  the San Rafael was operating out of Sausalito as the Mill Valley local at that time.   When the NPC was taken over by the North Shore in 1905, they began converting all their engines to oil burners.  The 1906 photo of the San Rafael at San Quentin shows her with what appears to be an oil tank in her tender.  It is likely this conversion happened as part of her rebuild after the 1905 Tomales engine house fire.

Hopefully a NPC or NWP historian can help us resolve these issues.