North Pacific Coast RR – Bully Boy 0-6-6T

NPC8-2_4x2

Builders photo of the Bully Boy of the North Pacific Coast Railroad at Mason Factory in 1877 loaded on a Lovells standard gauge flat for shipment.  .Source – “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” Graves – – p134.  Click picture for a larger image.

NPC_No8_Bldr_Enhanced_4x2

This is the same builders photo.  It is a scan of an original in the 1879 Mason Narrow Gauge Locomotive Catalog.  Click photo for a larger image.  Click here for a larger digitally enhanced version of this photo.  Photo and catalog from the Keith Christenson collection.  Thanks Keith.

Bully_Boy_steaming_4x2

This second Bully Boy builders photo was apparently taken before the prior photo.  It shows the Bully Boy with both a front pilot and rear pilot.  It also shows a headlight, a rare feature on a Mason Builder’s photo.  Click photo for a larger image.  Photo from the Keith Christenson collection.

NPC8-1_4x2

In action after installation of a new stack.  She was damaged by a fire in 1905 and never rebuilt.  She was scrapped in 1912.  Shot leaving the Sausalito train shed.Source – “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” – p50 and Redwood Railways – Kneiss p62Click picture for a larger image.

 

 

 

 

Name Bully Boy Number 8
Works No 584 Type 0-6-6T
Date 1877 Drivers 3’1″
Cylinders 13×16 Weight
Gauge 3’0″
Later RR North Western Pacific

Known Facts:  Sold to the North Pacific Coast in 1877 by Mason (Abbott & Graves).  Was used in picnic service, on the Mill Valley run, and as a work train at various points in her life.  Was often used in situations where she needed to run in both directions because a turntable was not available.  Damaged in an engine house fire in Tomales in 1905, the Bully Boy was not rebuilt, ending up on the scrap pile.

Speculation:  A Roy Graves drawing shows her with pilots mounted to both ends in “Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods” p156.  While no photographic evidence we’ve seen supports this, it is likely that she had pilots at both ends during part of her career because the NPC had a number of local runs to terminals lacking a turntable to turn engines around.  We have photos of her sister engine, the San Rafael with pilots on both ends.

This is the original NPC #3 Tomales.  She was never delivered to the North Pacific Coast.Source – “The Northwestern Pacific Railroad” – Stindt – p276Click photo for a larger image.
She was delivered to the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio in 1876 and became number 22 and was given the name Dixi Crosby.  Here is a builders photo of her wearing Galveston colors.This photo is from the Keith Christenson Collection.Click photo for a larger image.
Name Tomales Number 3
Works No 584 Type 0-6-6T
Date 1877 Drivers 3’0″
Cylinders 15×20 Weight
Gauge 3’0″
Later RR Northwestern Pacific

Facts:  According to Graves and Stindt she was built by Mason in 1874, and was Mason builders #563.  While she was originally assigned NPC engine number 3, she was never delivered to the NPC and was sold to the Minnesota Midland.  Then she was resold to the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio becoming number 22 and named the Dixi Crosby.  She was regauged to standard gauge and became the Southern Pacific’s number 658 in 1884 (Graves).

According to the Abbott builders list, She was sold to the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio in 1876 and became number 22 and was given the name Dixie Crosby.  The NPC and the Minnesota Midland are not mentioned in the Abbott list.  She had 15 x 20 cylinders and 3’0″ drivers.  With these dimensions she was not an identical sister of the Bully Boy.

Speculation:

It is unclear why the NPC never took delivery of the Tomales.  Clearly she came close enough to delivery to have a builders photo.  Did the fact she was never delivered have something to do with the rail jumping tendencies of the early Mason Bogies?  Did the fact that the San Rafael ended up on her roof in Tomales Bay in 1875 have anything to do with the cancelled order.  Maybe a NPC historian can help us resolve this question.

Three sources (Abbott, Graves, & Stindt) indicate that the name used on the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio in 1876 was the Dixie Crosby.  Yet the above photo shows the spelling as Dixi Crosby.  We are hoping someone with knowledge of the history of the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio railroad can resolve this inconsistency.

It is not known whether this engine was ever delivered to the Minnesota Midland.  Hopefully, someone with a knowledge of this line can resolve this issue.

Based on Graves comments, it is not clear whether this engine was regauged to standard gauge prior to shipment to the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio or when the railroad became part of the Southern Pacific system.  Stindt indicates it was converted prior to shipment.  The Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio RR is not listed in Hilton’s “American Narrow Gauge Railroads” so it is probable that she was converted to standard gauge by Mason prior to shipment in 1876.  We are hoping someone with knowledge of the history of the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio railroad can verify this assumption.

The following is a collection of logos of the NPC and its successor lines.  Colors are limited to the Web color pallet and are probably not accurate.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>